On May 25, 2020, Mr. George Floyd was murdered. His death was the result of police brutality and a lack of regard for black human life. For so many reasons - not least of which because I am a black woman and mother - I am mad as hell about it. Mad because these very real systemic racial challenges have been the same for centuries and mad because, despite good people working tirelessly to make the world better, there is still no solution in sight. 

For me, like many at DT Global and around the world, this is an extremely emotional time. When the news first broke, I cried a lot, was terrified for my children, and felt completely helpless; now I am mad, and my anger is fueling my motivation for real change.  

As a lifelong Human Resources professional and DT Global’s Director of HR in the United States, I am proud of the purpose for my role in support of people, first and foremost. I am motivated by the ongoing and continued work I am doing to improve Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion within DT Global. I am fortunate because I have an opportunity to foster change daily and have vital impact right where I am, implementing a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion program that will touch thousands of lives. Diversity generates organizational strength. Equity seeks to ensure lasting fair treatment and equality of opportunity and resources for all. Inclusion is the foundation of culture, belonging, and all people feeling welcomed to participate. These are all values I stand behind and stand for in my work, and these are the core values upon which DT Global is being built. 

Currently, DT Global is working to increase Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in our workplace by conducting listening sessions. The listening sessions will inform the strategies needed to build a vision and commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. This process will start with creating a DEI working group of employees to drive results and the demonstrated change we seek. While my work in support of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion is motivating me, it is my hope that is maintaining me. 

As bleak as things look today, why hope? Because I must. Like so many other generations before me, I hope for black people to be seen, heard, and treated with respect and dignity. I hope for changed hearts, minds, and basic human empathy. I hope for a day when I am not afraid for my children’s life or my own due to the color of my skin. That is not today, but until then I am mad, motivated, and maintaining. I hope you are too.